- 1 minute lesson -

Continue to grainhappy.com

Rim Lighting

Photography TipsHave you ever tried to use rim lighting? It's a great thing to know if you haven't learned yet, and here's a short refresher if you already know. When there's a light on the far side of someone, the light leaks through right around their head illuminating their hair or hat. Sometimes the line can be so crisp that it looks as though they're being cut out. Rim light is beautiful, and it adds a ton of visual interest to a photo. The real win here is taking an extra second to try and look around your environment for some kind of rim lighting. Don't settle for the light you're given, find better light. And also plan to show up during golden hour, instead of trying to do photoshop later and add in something fake. More about rim lighting from New York Institute Of Photography: https://www.nyip.edu/photo-articles/cameras-and-gear/what-is-rim-lighting

Continue to grainhappy.com

Continue to grainhappy.com

Photography Tips Graphic
IG logo Twitter Logo Podcast Photo Tips Youtube Logo Facebook Logo Snapchat Logo

Optimizing Your Images and Website

As photographers it’s almost too easy to have a slow-loading website.  We want them to look fabulous and show off our photos, but at the same time we want them to pop up really fast and be easy to get around. So here’s the good part — this article is all about two critical decisions you can make to help your site load fast.   1. First critical decision: Optimize Your Images For The Web This is the more obvious of the two, but often misunderstood.  When I mix down images from Lightroom, there are what seems like a million and one choices to make, and no easy handbook on how to mix them down.  What makes it more difficult is that the “best” settings can be different based on exactly what you’re trying to accomplish.  When I optimize my images for web, I think about the following three things: I want them to load fast I want them to be the right size I want my images to be sharp on screen LOADING FAST: Let me give you an example of a typical image we’ll host on High Five For Love’s site.   The width is 2048px, and the height is 1365px.  When we mixed it down out of Lightroom, I chose 55% JPEG quality.  Choosing this amount of compression allows the image to have a small file size and load fast.  If you over-do the compression, you’ll see artifacts start to affect the image in a negative way. Here’s an example of overdoing the compression! Left side: 55 Quality out of Lightroom | Right side: 0 Quality out of Lightroom Look closely in the above image — look for banding on the right side.  The gradient that looks nicer on the left turns into block-steps of grays on the right image when you […]